Johnny Flynn and the Sussex Wit

This band is a folky, acoustic guitar God-send. Not the twangy, spangly, auto-tuned kind of folk that makes one want to rip their ears off, no, rather, the technically accurate, banjo-meets-violin kind of folk that evokes nothing but ear-joy.

A Church in Bethnal Green, ft. Johnny.

Apologies for the blur.

I am incredibly anal about email inbox being kept under-control (unlike my boyfriend, who has committed the heinous crime of allowing his emails to get into quadruple figures – sickening).

Anyway, because of my need to obsessively control my inbox, I dislike being pounded with spam emails throughout the day, and therefore, only subscribe to three mailing-lists:

  1. http://johnny-flynn.com
  2. Tesco Clubcard offers
  3. Amazon Prime deals

I don’t know if number 2 & 3 even count as subscriptions, but that only goes to show how important number 1 is.

Give them a listen. I have been doing so for over a decade and still haven’t tired of their music.

As is the case for any true fan girl, it takes more than one hand to count the amount of times that I have seen this band perform. Again, I don’t think i’ll ever tire. Whether they are bringing out Laura Marling for a duet, or Marcus Mumford for a surprise jam, or even if it’s just Johnny going solo, they never disappoint. The front-man himself exudes sincerity and calm, and the lyrics are south-eastern poetry. They even have a song about ‘elephant hunters from Ebbsfleet’, and for some reason it’s called Wayne Rooney.

Rough Trade East was the location of Johnny’s most recent London gig.

The “independent music and media store” has a Narnian-Wardrobe quality to it; the record shop itself resides on a dirty backstreet off of Brick Lane, next to a few bars and a couple of late night food trucks.

However, step inside and find yourself in amongst it; mood lights, wall art…gin and tonic cans costing almost a ten pounds each, and books, lots of books, which, for some ungodly reason, are placed right where you would have liked to stand, to see the performance better. It was similar to how I imagine those children felt, standing in that cupboard full of scratchy winter coats because their sister promised them magic. But, like Lucy, if you stand amongst the out-door-attire for long enough, magic shall arrive.

My only issues with the night were, in fact, brought on by my own human error:

  1. I arrived late, and therefore, could not see the stage
  2. On the way to the gig, I left my glasses in the door of the car and therefore, could not see the stage

So, to summarise:

  • If you have a prescription, take it seriously – keep your glasses on your face
  • Get down to you YouTube and give a listen to Johnny Flynn and the Sussex Wit